All posts tagged “d-i studio

D-i 2017-2018 Seminars – n.12: Becoming Infrastructural

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Monday, February 19th 2018, we are hosting our ‘Seminar Series n.12
Delta Interventions Studio North-Sea Landscapes of Coexistence’:

Becoming Infrastructural
Monday, February 19th — 14:00 – 16:00
Berlagezaal 1 — Faculty of Architecture , TUDelft
dr. Rossi Exo Adams
Assistant Professor of Architecture, College of Design – Iowa State University USA

Becoming-Infrastructural
“It is hard to imagine how the many ruptures that have occurred in the composition of whatever may be called “normality” today do not render canonical architectural knowledge a distant constellation, receding from our present. Nor is it difficult to see how such ruptures are themselves a stern reminder of our need for new forms of knowledge altogether—forms that reject the assurances of a professionalized architectural discourse, and that call instead for a new horizon of common, intersectional and necessarily partisan modes of inquiry. For, what do the ongoing events of climate change, the displacement of peoples across the surface of the earth, the emboldening of racist violence, or the neocolonial plunder of the natural world have in common if not an emerging struggle over how the figure of the human in the world is to be understood?
The figure of the human body has played a consistent role throughout history in both the way space is imagined and how power finds its form. There is a history, yet to be written, in which key representations of the human body at once call into existence and justify certain modes of government while simultaneously suggesting ideal ways to organize the spaces of the world. Yet representations of the body that dominate any given period not only offer an ideal: they must also conceal secrets by which the masses of real, fleshy bodies may be governed; they must at once offer an exemplary figure and its inherent flaw or defect—both a universal truth to guide bodies and a ubiquitous site of intervention through which to coerce them.
This is also a spatial matter: if the body can suggest certain inherent principles of justice and order by which to best organize human life, the body will inevitably inscribe itself into the spaces, architectures, and worlds of human experience. Representations of the human body, we might say, are coded diagrams that collect certain knowledges of the human condition in order to grant access to the ways in which power and space intersect.”

More information at: https://rossexoadams.com

This seminar is part of the MSc3-4 Seminar Series of D-i 2017-2018 Graduation Studio

1. Re-Nature
Taneha Bacchin

2. Lowlands/ Coastal Design
Han Meyer & Janneke van Bergen

3. On Representation
Stefano Milani

4. The Limits of the City
Nicola Marzot

5. Coastal Landscapes
Stefan Aarninkhof

6. Ecologies of Power
Hamed Khosravi

7. Ways of Seeing
Frits Palmboom

8. On Perception
Catherine Vennart

9. Layers, Times, Scales
Han Meyer

10. North Sea Odyssey
Dirk Sijmons

11. The Agency of the Section
Fransje Hooimeijer

12. Becoming Infrastructural
Roos Exo Adams

13. Grounding deregulation and contemporary warfare
Nick Axel

14. Scapes
Giovanna Silva

Landscapes in Transition – International Seminar TUDelft & MIT


Delta Interventions – Interdisciplinary Graduation Studio 2017-2018
Delta Urbanism Research Program

Seminar: Landscapes in Transition
06th October 2017
16:30 – 18:30

Berlage 1, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment

Design Studios Talk
organised by
Delta Urbanism/ Delta Interventions Studio, TUD
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence
Taneha Bacchin, Hamed Khosravi

Urban Design Studio, MIT
Cities by Sea: Urbanism in the Age of Sea Level Rise
Rafi Segal, Alan Berger, Jonah Susskind

with
Urban Systems Studio, Dalhousie Architecture School – Halifax/ Canada
Catherine Venart

Program:

16:30 – 17:00
‘Ways of Seeing’
Frist Palmboom (TUD/ PALMBOUT Urban Landscapes)

‘Northscape’
D-i Graduate Students

Taneha Bacchin (TUD)
Hamed Khosravi (TUD)
Stefano Milani, Nicola Marzot, Diego Sepulveda, Filippo laFleur (TUD)

17:00 – 18:00
‘Landscapes in Transition’
Han Meyer (TUD)
Alan Berger (MIT)

Seminar host by Delta Interventions Studio North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence welcoming the visit of the Urban Design Studio ‘Cities by Sea: Urbanism in the Age of Sea Level Rise’, led by  Rafi Segal, Alan Berger, Jonah Susskind — MIT.  

D-i Studio will briefly present the first results of the research design on the North Sea, being developed jointly with the Urban Systems Studio, Dalhousie Architecture School – Halifax/ Canada, for the academic year 2017-2018.

 

Award Ceremony Archiprix 2017

Archiprix 2017 Prizes. Congratulations Laura!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our D-i 2015-2016 graduate ir. Laura Langridge, honourable mention Archiprix 2017 with her project: Ivalo River Sandbanks. 

On the banks of the Ivalo River in Finland, 250 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, time is marked by a unique ritual of seasons. In the far North, summer and winter pass by in extremes, and the turns of the seasons bring forth both beauty and challenge. For the people of Ivalo, time, river and culture are intertwined. While the river represents nourishment, recreation and transport for the village, it equally and critically also represents risk. Seasonal floods threaten to overcome existing engineered barriers, and the village’s current building practices are ill-suited for flood exposure. In response to this context, the project proposes a more passive architectural typology for the floodplain. Heavy stone and concrete bases temper the demands of water and ice, while light wood construction above addresses variations in daylight and the passage of time via weathering and renewal. This strategy is elaborated through a series of small buildings placed independently along sandbanks at the river’s edge. The buildings are uniquely site specific, but as a family they suggest a robust and unified architectural approach for the river in tune with the needs of both the landscape and the culture.

 

Prijsuitreiking Archiprix 2017_ 17 juni
Koepelgevangenis _ Haarlem Harmenjansweg 4, 2031 WK Haarlem
Jury:
Andy van den Dobbelsteen (theorie)
Karen de Groot (landschapsarchitectuur)
Frank Havermans (architectuur)
Caro van de Venne (architectuur)
Daan Zandbelt (stedenbouw)

 

North Sea – D-i Studio 2017-2018

Courtesy of Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC @ visibleearth.nasa.gov

Delta Interventions Studio 2017-2018
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence.
Transitional Spaces, Infrastructure and Power.

See here: Year Final Studio Exhibition
See here: Graduation Days

In collaboration with
RCA Royal College of Art, London
AA School Architecture, London
UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education
Het Nieuwe Instituut

Joint Design Studio with
Dalhousie Architecture School – Halifax/ Canada

Studio Leader
dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, t.bacchin (at) tudelft.nl
Coordinators

dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
dr.ir. Hamed Khosravi

Instructors/ Mentors
Architecture & Urbanism
dr.ir.
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
dr.ir. Hamed Khosravi
Architecture
ir. Stefano Milani
(Responsible Instructor for Architecture & Public Building)
dr.ir.
Nicola Marzot
Urbanism
dr.
Fransje Hooimeijer
dr. Diego Carmona Sepulveda
ir. Kristel Aalbers
ir. Filippo laFleur
Landscape Architecture
dr.ir.
Inge Bobbink
dr. Steffen Nijhuis
ir.
Denise Piccinini
Building Technology
ir. Sjap Holst

Student Assistant
Elise van Herwaarden

Graduation Sections
Urban Design
Architecture & Public Building
Environmental Modelling
Landscape Architecture
Policy Analysis
Hydraulic Structures & Flood Risk
Water Management


Delta Interventions (D-i) is an interdisciplinary graduation studio (architecture, urbanism, landscape architecture, hydraulic structures/ flood risk, water management, policy analysis) focusing on the transformations of delta/ coastal landscapes – the dynamic relation between natural processes and societal practices in both opportunities and threats for future urbanisation. D-i has a strong emphasis on the agency of spatial interventions in the production of territories, forming a narrative of space occupancy over time.  The studio takes stock of contemporary landscape urbanism theories and practice, next to the mutual relationships between architecture, engineering and territory, to explore potential paths forward in design thinking and practice.

For the academic year 2017-2018 Delta Interventions Studio focuses on the North Sea territory/region, particularly on its expected transformation driven by the consequences of extreme climate — recent studies (see ‘Nature’ article) concerning climate change scenarios suggest that by 2100 sea levels could rise up to 3 – 3.5 meters (instead of the 1.3 meter expected by the ‘extreme scenario’ of the Dutch Delta Program). 

D-i will explore the future geography of this common space and the possibility of a shifting position between land and water in which the sea becomes a transnational ground for climate adaptation strategies. As a landscape, the North Sea is the product of the dynamic relations between natural processes and the intensity of manmade activities. Its progressive urbanisation along the coastline creates disperse intensities structured by discontinuous and diverse infrastructure spaces.

Landscapes of Coexistence — A territorial perspective
Historically, the North Sea has been a contested territory. While bordering the mainland Europe it has been often turned into a platform for geopolitical affairs with the UK as well as the Nordic countries. Such strategic role has manifested itself in various military, religious, economic, and social ties and divides, which has consequently made the North Sea a confliction common ground. The ongoing refugee crisis or the Brexit are only very recent examples of such a long history. As a result, the sea is not seen anymore a periphery of Europe but rather a central territory and a point of departure through which the idea of Europe would be defined or challenged. Therefore, in the North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio we would celebrate these controversial aspects of the sea, not anymore as an extra-territorial space and a limit to the land, but rather as the main point an autonomous entity through which the political, environmental, economic and societal questions could be addressed. In this way any spatial proposition, whether landscape, urban or architectural, would be challenged and revisited through the lens of the North Sea as a referenced territory for new spatial interventions. Students are encouraged to redefine the role of the territory of the sea and particularly its land borders/ coastal cities, addressing the complex, yet not so visible, spatial, juridical, environmental and geopolitical natures of the North Sea for the design of spatial interventions that are informed by climate adaptation and clean energy futures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Studio Assignment

During the graduation year students will be asked to reflect on aspects of spatial morphology (scale, form, structure, performance), landform (geology, altimetry/bathymetry, topography), and the diachrony/ diversity of mechanisms (e.g. logistics, energy production, coastal management, migration) re-shaping the North Sea continuously. D-i studio individual projects will be sited in different geographic locations along the sea’s east and west coastlines. Within the scope of the D-i studio, students will be able to formulate their fascination and choose their own assignment (design, engineering, policy) which can vary from buildings, constructions and public works to urban areas, landscapes and regions.

Studio Meta-Themes

– Risk and beyond: exploring a projective dimension towards the sea (and/or triggered by the sea), and in the specific context of the North Sea region

– Exploration of the limit: the notion of “limit” as conceptual framework at the base for an explorative design research in the North Sea region

– Water related design as a creative (or, conversely, innovative) form for reimagining Architecture/Urbanism/Landscape Architecture/Water Engineering purpose and their collective character

North Sea: 4 Studio Themes

1. Imagination
North Sea as State of Exception
Poetics of Infrastructure

2. Re-Nature
A Third Nature Manifesto

3. The Limits of the City
From Cities to Urban Systems: Territorialism

4. Ecologies of Power
Political Ecology of Urban Form and Integrated Infrastructure Space

North Sea: 4 Geographies

1. North Netherlands-Germany – from Bremen (Weser Estuary) to Den Helder, including the northern dutch islands
2. Dutch-Flemish Delta – from Rotterdam to Antwerp
3. South-east UK coast – from the coast of Norwich to the Thames Estuary
4. Norwegian South-west coast – from Bergen to the Skagerrak Strait (Kristiansand)

Studio objectives

  • To develop an innovative didactic exchange among the disciplines of Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis
  • To operate analytical research at the large territorial scale of delta regions
  • To formulate comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Engineering and Policy design strategies (considering the different spatial and temporal scales relevant for the design)
  • To elaborate and apply a comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis research and innovative design methodologies
  • To prepare students to work on both research innovation and design projects in design offices and governmental departments

Learning objectives

  • Students will be able to operate analytical research at a large territorial scale of delta regions
  • Students specific architectural/urban/landscape/engineering/policy interscalar design task
  • Students will be able to share and integrate knowledge from other disciplines
  • Students will be able to formulate a highly individualised design approach
  • Students will be able to apply innovative design methodologies and creative techniques for their design
  • Students will be able to select and apply comprehensive constructive techniques
  • Students will be able to express and represent their design ideas at appropriate scales

Courtesy of H+N+S: NORTH SEA+ENERGY 2050 – An Energetic Odyssey. Commissioned Study for IABR 2016  > See video 

Courtesy of OMA – Zeekracht, The North Sea – Netherlands. Commissioned Study for Natuur en Milieu 2008 > See report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students

Architecture
Ailsa Craigen/ Deniz Üstem/ Efrain Fajardo Ibarra/ Elise van Herwaarden/ Fathima Nafeesa Hamza/ Gerben van den Oever/ Joanna Kosowicz/ Julia Holtland/ Karlijn Scholtens/ Mihai Turtoi/ Xiaoyue Hu

Urbanism
Aikaterina Myserli / Alexandra Farmazon/ Jan Michael Cyganski/ Jie Wang/ Junzhong Chen/ Neil Moncrieff/ Niroopa/ Qing Ma/ Shaoning Wu/ Ye Hu/ Yelin Zhang/ Yi-Chuan Huang/ Wenxin Jin

Landscape Architecture
Malou Visser

Water Management
Geert van der Meulen

Delta Interventions Studio 2017-2018 @ North Sea Field Trip. With Dalhousie Architecture School Joint Design Studio. October 2017, Lincoln, South-East England, UK

San Francisco Bay, USA

Courtesy of EROS Data Center

Delta Interventions Studio 2016-2017 (first round of graduations July 2017)
San Francisco Bay – Resilience by Design.
Designing for uncertain delta-landscape futures.

Joint Design Studio
TU Delft / UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design
Supported by DIMI Delft Deltas, Infrastructure & Mobility Initiative

UC Berkeley 
Advanced Urban Design Studio
Responsible Instructor/ Coordinator
prof.dr.ir. Peter Bosselmann

TU Delft
Responsible Instructor/ Coordinator
dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, t.bacchin (at) tudelft.nl
Professors
prof.dr.ir. Han Meyer (emeritus)
prof.ir. Frits Palmboom (emeritus)

Instructors/ Mentors
Architecture & Urbanism
dr.ir.
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Architecture
ir. Stefan de Koning
Urbanism
dr.
Fransje Hooimeijer
dr. Diego Carmona Sepulveda
ir. Kristel Aalbers
Landscape Architecture
dr.ir.
Inge Bobbink
Building Technology
ir. Sjap Holst

Teaching Assistant
ir. Filippo laFleur

Graduation Sections
Urban Design
Architecture & Public Building
Environmental Modelling
Landscape Architecture
Policy Analysis
Hydraulic Structures & Flood Risk
Water Management


Delta Interventions (D-i) is an interdisciplinary graduation studio (architecture, urbanism, landscape architecture, hydraulic structures/ flood risk, water management, policy analysis) focusing on the transformations of delta landscapes – the dynamic relation between natural processes and societal practices in both opportunities and threats for future urbanisation. D-i has a strong emphasis on the agency of spatial interventions in the production of territories. The studio investigates the possibilities to combine flood protection and water management strategies with urban design, landscape design and spatial planning, aiming at improving spatial forms and structures in urban and metropolitan delta regions. Part of Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Group, the studio develops design and planning approaches and methods which contribute to make urban delta landscapes more sustainable, attractive and adaptive.

For the academic year 2016-2017 the focus of the studio will be the assignment provided by the ‘Bay Area Resilience by Design Challenge’ launched in April 2016 by Chief Resiliency Officers from San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley, Bay Conservation and Development Commission, Association of Bay Area Governments, Bay Area Regional Collaborative, San Francisco Estuary Institute, SPUR, the Climate Readiness Institute, and the California Coastal Conservancy. Inspired by ‘New York’s Rebuild by Design’ the design competition aims at addressing challenges affecting the resiliency of San Francisco Bay Area neighbourhoods, environment, and infrastructure in an era of climate uncertainty. In collaboration with the University of California, Berkeley, College of Environmental Design, Delta Interventions Studio seeks to develop innovative projects to increase Bay Area’s adaptive capacity and local area performance in response to future uncertainty in climate and urbanisation patterns.

Within this scope of the delta, students are free to follow their fascination and choose their own assignment (design, engineering, policy and management) which can vary from buildings, constructions and public works to urban areas, landscapes and regions.

Courtesy of DigitalGlobe @ visibleearth.nasa.gov

Image copyright GeoEye @ visibleearth.nasa.gov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students

Architecture
Bjorn Marsman/ Dinah Carolina Pastor/ Felix Ahuis/ Gijs Beckman/ Lujia Xu/ Sacha Noorlander/
Tijs Niessen/ Zhuting Li/ Mehran Samiyi/ Licheng Wang

Urbanism
Supriya Krishnan/ Sergio Abraham Berumen/ Milburn Sumanth Subbarao/ Pim Monsma/ Seul Lee/
Sahil Ajay/ Kanekar Rahul Dewan/ Max Suijkerbuijk/ Jeroen van der Kwaak/ Lisanne Viergeves/
Menghan Zheng/ Peter Steehouder

Landscape Architecture
Leyang Chen/ Menghan Fu/ Jiayan Tan

Technology, Policy & Management (elective course)
Nishchal Sardjoe

Water Management (elective course)
Geert van der Meulen

Delta Interventions Studio 2016-2017 @ San Francisco Bay Field Trip/ UC Berkeley Joint Design Studio. October 2016, Hunters Point, SF, California

 

 

 

Joint Design Studio Concept
Text by 
Prof. Peter Bosselmann
College of Environmental Design/ University of California at Berkeley/ Master Program in the Design of Urban Places/ Urban Places Advanced Studio

San Francisco Bay is a tidal estuary of the Pacific Ocean connected to the inland delta of the Sacramento and San Joachim Rivers. The landform in which the Bay resides has a roughly 500,000 year history. Here estuaries existed 7 times, each time during interglacial periods. In its current form the Bay existed for approximately 8.000 years. Tidal estuaries form a water to land transition zone. By the mid 1800’s the Bay had formed an estuarine to terrestrial transition zone of over 250,000 acres or 110,000 ha. This large area is referred to as the baylands. Prior to urbanisation this transition zone was primarily made up of tidal marshes and tidal mud flats. The use of the baylands changed greatly in the 200 years of urbanisation. Approximately 50.000 acres of reclaimed land were added.  In the year 2000 only 60,000 acres of tidal marshes and tidal flats remained. The baylands in their changed condition still exist at roughly at the same low elevations. It is this transition zone that is most precious as society confronts sea level rise. Here design decisions have to be made. Some designs include tidal marsh restoration that also protects upland conditions from sea level rise. These restorations are referred to as soft edge solutions. Approximately 9,000 acres of restored tidal marshes have been added since 1999. In other areas decisions still have to be made with a current emphasis on restoring the transition zone. That leaves around 84,000 acres where urbanisation has occupied lands close to the water’s edge and where hard edge solutions will be necessary. For the landscape ecologist these 84,000 acres are degraded ecosystems or patches. For an urban designer the design of such patches needs to include human activities, sometimes intensely human, allowing people, sometimes in great numbers, access right up to the water’s edge. It is the design of such places that is most challenging. Residing in proximity to water, overlooking water, stepping down to water, sensing water on approach to the shoreline—these are profoundly human experiences that sustain human life in cities; especially the life of those who live in cities near water. The dichotomy implied in these words between designing in support of natural processes and designing for human needs and values will be reflected in our studio work.

The discussion about the design of the transition zone between water and land has been discussed since 1965, when the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission was established. A more current discussion about the future of the transition zone is only in the beginning stages as the sciences about the consequences of climate change have become better known. The design of the transition zone requires a balance between engineering solutions that protect the functions of communities, and the repair or reconstruction of ecological systems. Cities around San Francisco Bay are discussing adaptation strategies with built-in redundancies. Such strategies introduce multiple and overlapping designs to create redundancy in the defense against flooding. Wherever available space permits, redundancy is preferred over a single line of defense. Redundancy increases safety in the long run.

The danger is that the maps showing projected inundations of the transition zone by some date in the distant or not so distant future will scare society into making major mistakes that would have otherwise never been considered.   I would consider it a mistake, if for example infrastructure funding to improve bridges and highways would make large coastal engineering protection measures feasible without examining more benign interventions. A moveable barrier at the Golden Gate between San Francisco and Marin County would be such a mistake.  Mistakes will be made; an approach to design is necessary that is incremental and allows us to repair mistakes. Much more frequently than in the past, the context of climate change forces designers to ask, how do we repair our designs, if they fail?

To start our work we will travel to different locations around San Francisco Bay. We will draw a transect over the baylands to select locations that are representative of the transition zone between land and water. From such a survey we will select 10 sites that will potentially become the sites for the actual 2017 competition. Individually, or in small groups we will produce “tentative designs”. I have borrowed the term tentative design from Giancarlo di Carlo, the Italian architect and educator who coined the term to clarify that spatial design is like any other form of decision making effort. To approach a decision in the context of many interrelated variables a designer works on spatial solutions to test the implications of decisions made.  Such a process can only be tentative at first, done by a designer who keeps an open mind about initial solutions and understands that revisions and changes will become necessary.

Delta Interventions MSc. Graduation Studio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-i Studio 2017-2018
D-i Studio 2016-2017
D-i Studio 2015-2016
Archive

Delta Interventions (D-i) is an interdisciplinary graduation studio (architecture, urbanism, landscape architecture, hydraulic structures & flood risk, water management, policy analysis) focusing on the transformations of urbanised/urbanising delta landscapes – the dynamic relation between natural processes and societal practices in both opportunities and threats for future urbanisation.

D-i has a strong emphasis on the agency of spatial interventions in the production of territories, forming a narrative of space occupancy over time. The studio investigates the possibilities to combine flood protection and water management strategies with urban design, landscape design and spatial planning, aiming at improving spatial forms and structures in urban and metropolitan delta regions.

Part of Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Group, the studio develops design and planning approaches and methods which contribute to make urban delta landscapes more sustainable, attractive and adaptive. In this context, infrastructure space is analysed and designed as a medium – manifesting the programmatic dimensions and the multiscalar nature of the territorial project: architecture, urban design and landscape design. The studio takes stock of the mutual relationship between architecture, engineering and the territory to explore potential paths forward in design thinking and practice.

— Themes & Methods
Urban Landscape Dynamics, Narratives & Values
Performative Design/ Process-Based Design
Dynamic Adaptation (Designing with Uncertainty)/ Climate Adaptation
Landscape Urbanism/ Sustainability & Liveability
Landscape Infrastructure (Green-Blue Infrastructure Design/ Water Sensitive Design/ Building with Nature)
Integrated Spatial Planning & Flood Risk Management
Territorialism/ Infrastructure Spaces
Public Works (Buildings)

Additional information at TU Delft Enrolment
Studio Leader dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, t.bacchin (at) tudelft.nl

D-i Studio 2016-2017 San Francisco Bay Resilience by Design: Genealogy of Adaptation – Relation Map between D-i projects/ design principles

 

D-i Studio 2015-2016

Examples of students work — graduated students year 2015-2016 — Architecture Laura Langridge — Ivalo River Sandbanks (An exploration of built form in a highly dynamic river environment) · Archiprix 2017 Honorable Prize — Urbanism Filippo laFleur — Re-Territorialisation (A vision for Milan Urban Region) · Archiprix Nominee 2018 — Landscape Urbanism Vedran… Read More

D-i 2017-2018 Seminars – n.6: Ecologies of Power

Thursday, September 28th 2017, we are hosting the sixth day of our seminar series ‘Delta Interventions Studio North-Sea’:

Ecologies of Power
Thursday, September 28th — 08:45 – 10:45
Room C — Faculty of Architecture , TUDelft
dr.ir. Hamed Khosravi (Architecture/ Urbanism, TUDelft)

For more information, please see:
http://www.hamedkhosravi.com/

La Balsa de la Medusa
Jean Louis Theodore Gericault, 1818-19

This seminar is part of the MSc3 Seminar Series of D-i 2017-2018 Graduation Studio

1. Re-Nature
Taneha Bacchin

2. Lowlands/ Coastal Design
Han Meyer & Janneke van Bergen

3. On Representation
Stefano Milani

4. The Limits of the City
Nicola Marzot

5. Coastal Landscapes
Stefan Aarninkhof

6. Ecologies of Power
Hamed Khosravi

7. Ways of Seeing
Frits Palmboom

8. On Perception
Catherine Vennart

9. Layers, Times, Scales
Han Meyer

10. North Sea Odyssey
Dirk Sijmons

11. The Agency of the Section
Fransje Hooimeijer

D-i 2017-2018 Seminars – n.5: On Coastal Engineering

This week Delta Interventions Studio ‘North-Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence’ is hosting the fifth day of our seminar series:

Coastal Engineering – Building with Nature
Tuesday, September 26th — 10:30 – 11:30
Room B — Faculty of Architecture , TUDelft
prof. dr. ir. Stefan Aarninkhof (Coastal Engineering, TUDelft)

For more information, please see:
Coastal Engineering Section, TUDelft
Building with Nature, Ecoshape

Frames from Video: “The Sand Motor – Passionate Research”
Courtesy: ecoshape.org – link to video

This seminar is part of the MSc3 Seminar Series of D-i 2017-2018 Graduation Studio

1. Re-Nature
Taneha Bacchin

2. Lowlands/ Coastal Design
Han Meyer & Janneke van Bergen

3. On Representation
Stefano Milano

4. The Limits of the City
Nicola Marzot

5. Coastal Landscapes
Stefan Aarninkhof

6. Ecologies of Power
Hamed Khosravi

7. Ways of Seeing
Frits Palmboom

8. On Perception
Catherine Vennart

9. Layers, Times, Scales
Han Meyer

10. North Sea Odyssey
Dirk Sijmons

11. The Agency of the Section
Fransje Hooimeijer