All posts tagged “TT Studio

Transitional Territories Studio — 2019-2020 North Sea Landscapes of Coexistence: New Academic Year

Daniel Spoerri
Topographie anécdotée du hasard
1962 | © 2019 Daniel Spoerri / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ProLitteris, Switzerland

Transitional Territories Studio
2019-2020

 

North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence.
A Topography of Chance

“The sea was the beginning and the end of everything” 
— Fred D’Aguiar

“Humans cannot live, nor live in security, unless they assume that the active struggle between earth and water is over, or at least contained”
— Gilles Deleuze

 

Studio Leader
dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, t.bacchin (at) tudelft.nl

Special Guest Professors
prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons
prof.ir. Han Meyer

Instructors/ Mentors
dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
dr.ir. 
Luisa Calabrese
dr. Fransje Hooimeijer

dr. Diego Sepulveda Carmona
dr. Daniele Cannatella
ir. Geert van der Meulen

Guest Mentors (project based staff)
List to be announced soon.

Graduation Sections/ Chairs
Urban Design
Architectural Design Crossovers
Environmental Modelling
Landscape Architecture
Hydraulic Structures & Flood Risk (Faculty of Civil Engineering & Geosciences)
Policy Analysis (Faculty of Technology, Policy & Management)

In collaboration with — Special Lecture Series Program
Delta Futures Lab
MVI North Sea Energy Lab

DRIFT, Dutch Research Institute for Transition
Oslo School of Architecture and Design
Satelliet Group
Formafantasma
Atlas of Places


 

Transitional Territories is an interdisciplinary design studio (MSc. Architecture and MSc. Urbanism tracks in collaboration with Landscape Architecture, Hydraulic Structures & Flood Risk, Policy Analysis) focusing on the notion of territory as a constructed project across scales, subjects and media. In particular, the studio focuses on the agency of design in territories at risk between land and water (maritime, riverine, delta landscapes), and the dialectical (or inseparable) relation between nature and culture.

Informed by Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Spatial Planning & Urban Design theory & research, the studio explores—through design and representation—new pathways of inquiry moving beyond traditional methods and concepts. During the graduation year, students will develop an analytic, critical and conceptual approach to design and learn how to use the project as knowledge producer (Viganò, 2016) by means of cartography, system analysis, phenomenology (of time/ space), narration, process based design, scenario planning and systems thinking (uncertainty). The scale of individual projects can vary from buildings and (infra)structures to entire landscapes and regions. The studio is founded on notions of complexity, territorialism, infrastructure space, (landscape) ecology, environmental risk (extremes), geophilosophy, biopolitics, transition and policy analysis.

 


 

For the academic year 2019-2020, starting in September 2019, Transitional Territories Studio closes the three year-long cycle on the North Sea, focusing on the transformation of its territory throughout history and on its future ecology, landscapes, (political, architectural) spaces and flows (resources, logistics and migration). These changes are seen in different levels — from the transcalar and often invisible levels of processes to the scale of the architecture. As territory, the North Sea is understood as both abstract/ dematerialised space (political) and as concrete/ materialised space (architectural), that is, as a socially appropriated space.

After having disclosed, represented and analysed its past, present, and future geography over the past two years, this time the studio will project and delineate a radically different space for the North Sea territory. Inspired by the ‘Topographie Anecdotée du Hasard’ by Daniel Spoerri, the studio will set in motion a conversation between six lines of inquiry for the future of the North Sea region, briefed together with a group of artists, architects, philosophers, policy makers, scientists, and engineers. The final result of such a dialogue is a fluid topography, a fragmented inventory of objects and relations, in constant transformation throughout the year, where every individual project has a specific relational power.

Therefore, in the ‘North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence, A Topography of Chance Studio’ we will celebrate the coexistence between different claims in the sea, ranging from extractivism, energy, fishery, ecology, logistics and migration to carbon storage and climatic shifts structured into six lines of inquiry. Under this framework, the sea is not seen anymore as an extra-territorial space and a limit to the land, but rather as the central space through which the political, environmental, economic and societal questions could be addressed. In this way any spatial proposition, whether landscape, urban or architectural, would be challenged and revisited through the lens of the sea and its adjacent land, and by designed / desired associations and the agency of each individual project.

Six lines of inquiry:
— ‘The oceanic project’
edge, island state(s), power

— ‘Flux, erasure, terraforming’
inundation, erosion, ice

‘A pervasive ecology of flows
energy, fishery, logistics, migration, data

— ‘Capital’
oil / minerals / sand

— ‘The dual nature of externalities’
polluted grounds, salt intrusion, carbon and methane emissions, extreme weather

— ‘Crises of representation’
political divisions, cultural heritage, assemblages and dissonances


Scales and subjects:

Territory
Infrastructure
Landscape
Ground
Body

Geographic locations:
Land, coastal or sea locations/ cities and specific sites at the North Sea countries  Norway, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, England, Scotland.

The specific project location is of choice/ open to each individual project.

Theater of Combustion, Photography, Michael Hirschbichler. [Imagery collection. TT 2018-2019. MSc. Architecture, Author: Danny Arakji]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence — A territorial perspective
Historically, the North Sea has been a contested territory. While bordering the mainland Europe it has been often turned into a platform for geopolitical affairs with the UK as well as the Nordic countries. Such strategic role has manifested itself in various military, religious, economic, and social ties and divides, which has consequently made the North Sea a confliction common ground. The ongoing refugee crisis or the Brexit are only very recent examples of such a long history. As a result, the sea is not seen anymore a periphery of Europe but rather a central territory and a point of departure through which the idea of Europe would be defined or challenged. Therefore, in the North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio we would celebrate these controversial aspects of the sea, not anymore as an extra-territorial space and a limit to the land, but rather as the main point an autonomous entity through which the political, environmental, economic and societal questions could be addressed. In this way any spatial proposition, whether landscape, urban or architectural, would be challenged and revisited through the lens of the North Sea as a referenced territory for new spatial interventions. Students are encouraged to redefine the role of the territory of the sea and particularly its land borders/ coastal cities, addressing the complex, yet not so visible, spatial, juridical, environmental and geopolitical natures of the North Sea.

Studio Assignment

During the graduation year students will be asked to reflect on aspects of spatial morphology (scale, form, structure, performance), landform (geology, altimetry/bathymetry, topography), and the diachrony and diversity of mechanisms (e.g. logistics, energy production, coastal management, migration) re-shaping the North Sea continuously. TT studio individual projects will be sited in different geographic locations (of choice) along the sea’s north, central and south coastlines. Within the scope of the TT studio, students will be able to formulate their fascination and choose their own assignment (design, engineering, policy) which can vary from buildings, constructions and public works to urban areas, landscapes and regions.

Studio Meta-Themes

– Risk and beyond: exploring a projective dimension towards the sea (and/or triggered by the sea), and in the specific context of the North Sea region

– Exploration of the limit: the notion of “limit” as conceptual framework at the base for an explorative design research in the North Sea region

– Water related design as a creative (or, conversely, innovative) form for reimagining Architecture/Urbanism/Landscape Architecture/Water Engineering purpose and their collective character

Studio objectives

  • To develop an innovative didactic exchange among the disciplines of Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis
  • To operate analytical research at the large territorial scale of lowland regions
  • To formulate comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Engineering and Policy design strategies (considering the different spatial and temporal scales relevant for the design)
  • To elaborate and apply a comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis research and innovative design methodologies
  • To prepare students to work/ initiate both research and design projects in design offices and governmental departments

Learning objectives

  • Students will be able to operate analytical research across scale – from, territorial, landscape scales, to architectural, object scales
  • Students specific architectural/urban/landscape/engineering/policy interscalar design task
  • Students will be able to share and integrate knowledge from other disciplines
  • Students will be able to formulate a highly individualised design approach
  • Students will be able to apply innovative design methodologies and creative techniques for their design
  • Students will be able to select and apply comprehensive constructive techniques
  • Students will be able to express and represent their design ideas at appropriate scales through writings, drawings, and physical models

Additional information please visit:
TUDelft Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment – MSc3/4 Studio TT 2019-2020

 

Example of students work

North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio 2017-2018
End-of-the-year MSc4 Exhibition Book

North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio 2018-2019
MSc3 Exhibition (Project – Concept Phase) Book

North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio 2018-2019
MSc3 Exhibition (Research Phase II) Book ‘Islands—Tides’

Constructed Natures | One-day Symposium and Workshop

NASA Holds Media Briefing on Carbon’s Role in Earth’s Future Climate
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4749

Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Programme

Presents:
Constructed Natures
One-day symposium and workshop on extreme ecologies and its design space

05th April 2019
Workshop (EMU European Post-Master in Urbanism, under invitation)
09:00 – 12:30
Faculty of Architecture & the Built Environment, TU Delft
Berlagezaal 2

convened by
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin & Filippo LaFleur
Delta Urbanism, TUDelft
Muriz Djurdjevic
& Thomas Paturet

ATLAS OF PLACES

/

Symposium (public event)
14:00 – 16:30
Faculty of Architecture & the Built Environment, TU Delft
Berlagezaal 1

keynote
Filippo Lafleur
Delta Urbanism, TUDelft

invited speakers
Daan Zandbelt
Chief Government Advisor on the Built and Rural Environment,
College van Rijksadviseurs

Dirk Sijmons
H+N+S Landscape Architects / TUDelft

Muriz Djurdjevic & Thomas Paturet
ATLAS OF PLACES

convened by
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Delta Urbanism, TUDelft

 

under the framework of
DIMI Delft Deltas, Infrastructure and Mobility Initiative NEXT-EXTREMES
EMU European Post-Master in Urbanism 
Transitional Territories Studio

Late stage capitalism, with the rise of neoliberal policies and the financialization of the economy, is exacerbating the signs of a system that creates the need for increasing cycles of extraction and production, in contrast with the actual carrying and regenerative capacity of earth systems. The extent of such impact is mostly visible in urban regions, such as the metropolitan landscape of the Randstad, where the urban landscape carpet is increasingly being operationalized to support the material streams for urbanization at the cost of an environment that is constantly being depleted.

Following a recent reconceptualization and discussion to overcome the nature – culture, economy – ecology and urban – rural dichotomy, a year-long project was set to study the extent/ feasibility of the idea that an alternative path for infrastructure and regional development is possible.

As seemingly unrelated fields, ground and atmosphere hold an inseparable bond: The Carbon cycle. Largely overlooked, the capacity of the ground to produce and sustain cycles of decomposition, recycling of organic matter, growth of plants, and carbon sequestration must be explored ‘by design’, in order to unravel possible future urban landscape transformation.

The ground, at the intersection between soil dynamics and atmospherical events, is the materialization of the photosynthetic capacity of the earth and crucial in the regulatory functioning of the carbon cycle, i.e. the major infrastructure sustaining and generating life on the planet. Answering to the most recent inquiries regarding the need of more radical climate adaptation strategies, the project aims at managing processes of change in infrastructure design, implementation and maintenance.

When analyzed diachronically, the history of modern civilization can be understood with a shift of carbon from the subsurface to carbon in the atmosphere, from the ground to the sky. Following this idea, the link between ground and carbon becomes evident.

The year-long project “Constructed Natures and The Architecture of Carbon Sequestration” would like to show and initiate a discourse on the possibilities of constructing nature as a territorial architecture of / for carbon sequestration.

The project generally explored the architecture and cultivation of regional landscapes and waterscapes as a novel or possible approach to infrastructure and public works. The outcomes of the project will be discussed with invited scholars and practioners in a one-day workshop and symposium

_

The symposium is organised by the Delta Urbanism Research Group under the framework of NEXT-EXTREMES, DIMI Delft Deltas, Infrastructures and Mobility Initiative in collaboration with the EMU European Post-master in Urbanism and Transitional Territories Graduation Studio.

 

Programme Symposium

14:00
Introduction by Taneha K. Bacchin
DIMI NEXT-EXTREMES Research Project Leader
Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Program, TU Delft


14:20
Lecture by Dirk Sijmons
H+N+S Landscape Architects


14:50
Lecture by Muriz Djurdjevic & Thomas Paturet
Atlas of Places


15:20
Short break


15:30
Key-note lecture by Filippo LaFleur
DIMI NEXT-EXTREMES Principal Investigator
Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Program, TU Delft


16:00
Concluding lecture and final remarks by Daan Zandbelt
College van Rijksadviseurs


16:30
Closing/ Drinks


 

Talks:

Panorama NL
Daan Zandbelt

Panorama Nederland is a future perspective for the spatial design of the Netherlands. It shows how the major social issues of today can be the key to welcome, structural improvements in the future. An optimistic and attractive picture of the future. The Netherlands faces a number of complex issues. Climate change, the aging society, the switch to renewable energy, the acute shortage of housing and the sustainability of agriculture. Each and every one of which we will all experience the consequences, in our landscape and in our lifestyle. With Panorama Nederland, the Board of Government Advisors sketches an optimistic and attractive picture of the future. A Netherlands that remains extremely recognizable for everyone, but that works fundamentally differently in all kinds of areas. It is up to the imagination, the desire as an engine.

— Daan Zandbelt (MSc) (1975) graduated with honorable mention from Delft University of Technology as an architect and urbanist and studied in Chicago at UIC. During his studies he organized INDESEM’98. In 2002 he founded Zandbelt&vandenBerg, architecture and urban design, in Rotterdam with Rogier van den Berg. The office operated succesfully for ten years with a team of around 10 employees. It estabislished a recognized position in the Dutch ecosystem of offices in urbanism and architecture. In 2013 Daan founded ZAUD (Zandbelt Architecture Urbanism & Design) an office for architecture and urbanism, in which he conducted projects in the same fields. In 2014 he joined as a partner De Zwarte Hond, an office for architecture and urbanism based in Rotterdam, Groningen and Cologne. From 2003 till 2016 he was part of the Chair of Metropolitan and Regional Design at Delft University of Technology, where he was assistant professor. Since 2016 Daan is ‘rijksadviseur’, government Advisor on the Built and Rural Environment. As such he advises the National Government and its partners solicited and solicited on spatial issues.He is part of Quality teams that supervise keyprojects such as the revitalization of the Afsluitdijk and the stations of the Zuidas (the Dutch CBD) and Schiphol airport. He sets out research-by-design projects to promote new fields of interest for the national government. And last but not least, last year, he launched Panorama Nederland with the CRa, to promote spatial planning at the national level and as an input for the new National Plan (NOVI).


 

“Overexploited Territories”
Muriz Djurdjevic & Thomas Paturet

“Our intervention aims at confronting the classical debates for and against the primacy of economy and employment, against the argument for maintaining landscapes and ecosystems intact. Should we exploit or maintain? Parallel to this argument exists the discussion around the benefits for local versus national populations, global or European interests. What our research shows is that planning (whether it be on land or on sea) is never truly biased, regardless of the efforts by the concerned actors to provide neutrality. In the end, it amounts to a political process linked to a specific paradigm or logic. Our work intents to raise questions and generate ideas on how the exploitation, using the the Baltic Sea as case, could be organised so humans can adequately manage and use the resources offered by the sea; today and in the future. Planning will become crucial in the Baltic Sea where user pressures are currently relatively manageable but are expected to witness a strong shift in the years to come.”

— Muriz Djurdjevic & Thomas Paturet graduated in 2016 from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne under the supervision of the Laboratory Basel. Their thesis “Atlas of Overexploited Territories – Baltic Sea” was exhibited at the 2016 Venice Biennale within the Baltic Pavilion. In 2016 it won the “Best Énoncé Théorique” prize awarded by the Architecture Faculty of the EPFL. Their master project “Voyage au centre de la mer, vers un archipel industriel,” follow-up of their thesis, won the Arditi Prize for the Best Diploma Project at the EPFL as well as an Anerkennung Next Generation Prize at the Swiss Arc-Awards. It was published in the “Archizoom BestOf 2016” and the “Graduate Directory 2017” in Wallpaper* Magazine. Since 2016, Muriz works at Herzog & de Meuron in Basel, Switzerland. Former editor at ATLAS OF PLACES, he now curates the collective HdM Pills proposing an alternative reading of Herzog & de Meuron’s work. Since 2017, Thomas works at MADE IN in Geneva and as a teaching assistant for the Charbonnet-Heiz Studio at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. He is also the editor of the online journal ATLAS OF PLACES.


 

“Mobilis in Mobile”
Dirk Sijmons

In this talk, Dirk Sijmons outlines the implications of the observation that we are living in the age of mankind, the Anthropocene. Four philosophical approaches towards the Antropocene are identified (Denialism, Eco-Modernism, Post-Humanism and Anthropocentrism 2.0) and the future political energy between these approaches are briefly sketched. The four stances are illustrated with examples from design and popular culture showing how they could function as navigating tools in a new geological era.*

*The talk was originally presented under the framework of ‘School’s Out! #2’ on Friday 22 February 2019, at the Independent School for the City.

— Prof. Dirk Sijmons, landscape architect, studied at Delft University of Technology. He worked at the Nature Conservation unit of the Ministry of Culture, Recreation and Social work from 1977 until 1981. From 1981 until 1984 he was head of the strategic policy development and research coordination unit of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries. From 1984 until 1990 he was head of the Landscape Architecture Department of the Dutch Forestry Commission. From 1990 until 1993 he was coordinator of the Landscape Architecture study programme of the Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam. In 1990 he was one of the three founders of H+N+S Landscape Architects. In 2004 Dirk Sijmons was appointed Dutch Government Advisor on Landscape. He received the prestigious Edgar Doncker award in 2007 for his contribution to Dutch culture. From 2008 until 2015 Sijmons was professor of Environmental Design at Delft University of Technology. In 2014 he was the chief curator of IABR ‘Urban by Nature’. In 2017 he received the prestigious premier award for Landscape Architecture, the IFLA – Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award – the highest honourable carrier prize for contribution in the field of Landscape Architecture.


 

“Constructed Natures”
Filippo LaFleur

Following a recent reconceptualization and discussion to overcome the nature – culture, economy – ecology and urban – rural dichotomy, a year-long project was set to study the extent/ feasibility of the idea that an alternative path for infrastructure and regional development is possible. As seemingly unrelated fields, ground and atmosphere hold an inseparable bond: The Carbon cycle. Largely overlooked, the capacity of the ground to produce and sustain cycles of decomposition, recycling of organic matter, growth of plants, and carbon sequestration must be explored ‘by design’, in order to unravel possible future urban landscape transformation. In this talk, Filippo LaFleur presents the precedents and recent outcomes of the year-long project on the Architecture of Carbon Sequestration as an envisioned take on infrastructure design and ecology under extremes. 

— Filippo LaFleur has been a researcher at the Department of Urbanism, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, TU Delft since 2015. He is principal investigator within the Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Group under the frameworks of Transitional Territories Studio and DIMI Delft Deltas Infrastructure and Mobility Initiative ‘Special Projects’. His interest lies at the intersection between landscape, urbanism and ecology in regards to spatial and temporal transformations of both land and maritime landscapes. Through projects he investigates interrelations between natural processes, societal practices, and (geo)political dynamics. He has a strong emphasis on the agency of spatial interventions and on the role of representation and design as research instruments.


 

“There is no place but here”
Taneha K. Bacchin

Our actions are being guided by extremes and by scarcity mentality that profoundly shape and reduce our vision of the environment’s future: radical climatic changes, extreme weather conditions, natural disasters’ higher frequency, increase in average temperatures and sea levels rises are often matched with lack of knowledge, resources, insight and action. This mindset is what shapes the unlikelihood of mitigating carbon emissions, restoring the extent of polluted grounds and increasing the supply of depleted resources. What we see is the rising of narratives and dialogues on the impossibility of life as we know it, the loss of any form of (re)assurance, where few trajectories of change seem to unfold and intersect: acceptance and release, nihilism and inaction, continuing repair or retreat, and finally novelty by means of a creative revolution are at the center of discourses. All debatable. 
If architecture cannot produce life but simply frame it by affording and/or constraining movements within a given environment and time, what is the design space that is left in each of these trajectories? Can we still act without the weight of self-criticism and the fear of failure?

This brief introduction aims at setting the stage of the invited talks, ranging from a historical and philosophical reading of navigating the anthropocene (Dirk Sijmons), to an architectural and political position on overexploited territories (Muriz Djurdjevic & Thomas Paturet), and finally to the emancipation (or radical take) of spatial design by constructing new natures (Filippo LaFleur) and portraying an optimistic/ attractive  future Panorama (Daan Zandbelt). 

— Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin is an architect, researcher and educator. She is Assistant Professor in Urban Design, Research Leader and Coordinator of Education of the Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Group at the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, TU Delft. She leads the Transitional Territories Graduation Studio and, together with Birgit Hausleitner, the EMU European Post-Master in Urbanism Spring Semester. Her research focuses on the relation between landscape architecture, infrastructure and urban form. Her current projects deal with the changing nature of the territorial project addressing extreme weather and resource scarcity. She is committee member of the International Water Association and serves as reviewer for several water journals. Her work has been funded internationally and exhibited at the Venice Biennale 2002, and 2018, and São Paulo Biennale 2013. Her upcoming books are Bio-Territoriality: the Architecture and Politics of Urban Nature, and Adaptation by Design, together with Filippo LaFleur. 

 

Transitional Territories – MSc4 Lecture Series Final: Workshop PLAY!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transitional Territories Graduation Studio 2018-2019
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence
Altered Natures and the Architecture of Extremes

— MSc4 Lecture Series Design Module: The North Sea
Closing Workshop

6th March 2019
Under the Sea: PLAY!
10:00 – 15:00
BK Faculty, TT Studio

Convened by
Harald Warmelink, Breda University of Applied Sciences, Games & Media Group
Wilco Boode, Breda University of Applied Sciences, Games & Media Group
Xander Keijser, Advisor at Rijkswaterstaat, Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management

 


 

For the closing session of the 2018-2019 Lecture Series program ‘The North Sea’, a dedicated intensive workshop session on serious gaming for Maritime Spatial Planning convened by Breda University of Applied Sciences, Games & Media Group.

The Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) Challenge 2050 is a computer supported simulation game that gives maritime spatial planners and stakeholders the ability to explore the diverse challenges of sustainable planning of human activities in the marine and coastal ecosystem.

The simulation game is built around the following blocks:
– Coexistence of uses
– Ecological, economic, environmental aspects
– Stakeholders claims and planning issues within a cross-border/ trans-national context

The coherence of specific interventions is seen in relation to other processes such like:
– Common Fisheries Policy
– Habitats and Birds Directive
– Integrated Coastal Zone Management
– Marine Strategy Framework Directive
– Renewable Energy Directive
– Strategic Environmental Assessment
– Trans-European Transport Network
– Water Framework Directive



The North Sea

The North Sea region is bordered by a number of strong economies, the United Kingdom (England and Scotland), France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway (non-EU member but a member of the European Economic Area), and is one of the most heavily used seas with extensive shipping, fishing, energy (hydrocarbon and offshore wind), aggregate extraction, defence, recreation and includes 2 of the world’s largest ports (Rotterdam and Hamburg).

The Blue Growth potential of the North Sea area was analysed in a 2014 report (“Blue Growth Scenarios and Drivers for Sustainable Growth” (Ecorys, et al., 2012) which estimated that the North Sea’s maritime (blue) economy represented at least €150 billion (or approximately 30% of the EU total) and employed at least 850,000 people. The following key sectors are considered the most important in the North Sea: offshore wind, offshore oil & gas, aquaculture, shipping, shipbuilding, cruise tourism and coastal protection.

Relevant pan-North Sea MSP institutions and structures
The North Sea Commission is a politically-led cooperation platform for regions around the North Sea, bringing together the Presidents and delegates appointed by the Regional Authorities immediately below the level of Government which border the North Sea. Through dialogue and formal partnerships, they aim to promote common interests, especially in relation to European Union institutions, national governments and other organizations dealing with issues that are relevant to the North Sea. The focus for the North Sea Commission’s work is the North Sea Region 2020 strategy document. It defines the following focus areas under the priority ‘Managing Maritime Space’; maritime spatial planning, exploitation of marine resources and the North Sea Maritime Stakeholder Forum.

The Commission has a thematic working group called Marine Resources, which includes a number of measures related to MSP in the North Sea, including exchange of best practice on MSP and ICZM across the North Sea and promoting dialogue between all users of the North Sea to facilitate policy integration.

MSP in the North Sea
The nations bordering the North Sea are developing MSP to fulfil their requirements under the
EU Directive for MSP, to deliver maritime spatial planning by March 2021. The following MSP activity is under way in the North Sea:

Belgium MSP for Belgian part of the North Sea (2014)
Germany MSP for North Sea EEZ (2009)
England MSP (regional MSP is under development for the North East Inshore Plan Area, North East Offshore Plan Area, South East Inshore Plan Area, South East Offshore Plan Area. The first plans, the East Marine Plans, were published in 2014. The second plans, the South Marine Plans, were published in 2018.)
Scotland (Regional MSP is being developed for 11 Scottish Marine Regions as set out by the Scottish Marine Regions Order 2015, with 5 of these included within the North Sea) 
The Netherlands Integrated Plan for the North Sea (2015) and the North Sea 2050 Spatial Agenda

National initiatives include developing arrangements for planning across jurisdictional boundaries, however there is currently no MSP at a North Sea scale. A need for strategic action has been noted, but a lack of overarching authority with a broad enough remit to facilitate the political co-operation required presents a key challenge. There is international co-operation on a regional basis; the Wadden Sea Forum provides a mechanism for Dutch-German-Danish trilateral co-operation including on Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) and provides a basis for co-ordination with regard to MSP.

 *Excerpts from  https://www.msp-platform.eu
(for further information please visit the site)

 

The Lecture Series was curated/ convened by prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons and dr.arch. Taneha K. Bacchin under the framework of MVI North Sea Energy Lab

Transitional Territories Studio
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence

Studio Leader:
dr.arch. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Guest Professor:
prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons
Researchers:
ir. Filippo laFleur
ir. Geert van der Meulen

Instructors/ Mentors:
Architecture & Urbanism
dr.arch.
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Architecture
arch.
Stefano Milani
dr.arch.
Nicola Marzot
Urbanism
dr.
Fransje Hooimeijer
dr. Diego Carmona Sepulveda
dr.arch. Luisa Calabrese
Landscape Architecture
dr. Daniele Cannatella
Building Technology
ir. Sjap Holst

Scales and subjects:
Territory
Infrastructure
Landscape
Ground
Body

Studio Themes:
State of Exception
New biopolitical order of the North Sea: ecology, energy, protein
Infrastructural Form
Where architecture, city, and territory meet
Fourth Nature
The rise of landscape as counter economy
The Last Lands
The architecture of the fluid ground

Transitional Territories – MSc4 Lecture Series: The North Sea. Closing Sessions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transitional Territories Graduation Studio 2018-2019
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence
Altered Natures and the Architecture of Extremes

— MSc4 Lecture Series Design Module: The North Sea
Concluding Sessions

11th February – 13th February
Curated/ convened by prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons and dr.arch. Taneha K. Bacchin / under the framework of MVI North Sea Energy Lab



Wicked Problems

February 11, 2019
10:00 – 11:00
BK Faculty – Classroom Q
·      Dominic Stead, TUDelft, ‘Wicked problems, complexity and uncertainty in the context of spatial planning and design’

February 12, 2019
10:00 – 11:00
BK Faculty – Classroom R
·      Pieter Bloemen, Delta Program, ‘Principles for the strategic development of the Dutch Delta Program’



Actor-Relational Approach to Planning and Design
February 13, 2019
10:30 – 12:30
BK Faculty – Berlagezaal 1
·      Luuk Boelens, Ghent University, ‘Actor Network Theory’
·      Martine Verweij, MVI-Energy/ TopSector Energy/ Green Bridges, ‘Transdisciplinary approach and co-creation’


* The lecture series program is open to the public. All cordially invited.

 

Transitional Territories Studio
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence

Studio Leader:
dr.arch. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Guest Professor:
prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons
Researchers:
ir. Filippo laFleur
ir. Geert van der Meulen

Instructors/ Mentors:
Architecture & Urbanism
dr.arch.
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Architecture
arch.
Stefano Milani
dr.arch.
Nicola Marzot
Urbanism
dr.
Fransje Hooimeijer
dr. Diego Carmona Sepulveda
dr.arch. Luisa Calabrese
Landscape Architecture
dr. Daniele Cannatella
Building Technology
ir. Sjap Holst

Scales and subjects:
Territory
Infrastructure
Landscape
Ground
Body

Studio Themes:
State of Exception
New biopolitical order of the North Sea: ecology, energy, protein
Infrastructural Form
Where architecture, city, and territory meet
Fourth Nature
The rise of landscape as counter economy
The Last Lands
The architecture of the fluid ground

Territory as a Project | Parliament of the North Sea. One-day Symposium and Exhibition

Transitional Territories Graduation Studio 2018-2019 — North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Programme DIMI Delft Deltas, Infrastructure & Mobility Initiative under the framework of NEXT-EXTREMES: Constructed Natures Presents: Territory as a Project 2nd one-day symposium and exhibition on extreme ecologies, urbanisation and forms… Read More

Transitional Territories – MSc3 Lecture Series: The North Sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transitional Territories Graduation Studio 2018-2019
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence
Altered Natures and the Architecture of Extremes

— MSc3 Lecture Series Research Module: The North Sea
25th September – 29th October.
Curated/ convened by prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons and dr.arch. Taneha K. Bacchin / under the framework of MVI North Sea Energy Lab

Seascape
September 25, 2018
08:45 – 10:45
BK Faculty – Classroom C
·      Taneha K. Bacchin, TUDelft, ‘Sea’
·      Han Meyer, TUDelft, ‘Lowland’

Ecology
October 2, 2018
09:30 – 11:30
TPM Faculty – Classroom H
·      Kim Cohen, University of Utrecht, ‘The paleogeographical history of the North Sea’
·      Tinka Murk, WUR, Marine Animal Ecology, ‘Sketch of the current marine ecological system and perspectives’

Energy
October 9, 2018
09:30 – 11:30
TPM Faculty – Classroom H
·      Dirk Sijmons, TUDelft / H+N+S Landscape Architects, ‘The energy transition and its spatial implications’
·      Ernst van Zuijlen, Director of Windwerk, ‘The deployment of Offshore wind’

Protein
October 16
09:30 – 11:30
TPM Faculty – Classroom H
·      Eelco Leemans, ‘Fishery aspects of the North Sea’
·      Willem Brandenburg, WUR, ‘Marine aquaculture and protein production’

Planning and Policy
October 29
09:30 – 12:30
BK Faculty – Berlagezaal 1
·      Welcome of the Architecture Association School of Architecture, Diploma Unit 7  Fluid Territories: The North Sea. Studio Masters: Hamed Khosravi and Platon Issaias
·      Leo de Vrees, Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment, ‘(Inter)national North Sea policy’
·      Jan Matthijsen, Ed Dammers & Hans Elzenga, PBL Dutch Environmental Assessment Agency, ‘The Future of the North Sea’

Sand
November 20
09:30 – 12:30
BK Faculty – Classroom U
·      Ferdinand Diermanse, Deltares, ‘Sea level rise scenarios and its consequences for water safety and sand excavation’
·      Maarten de Jong, Imares, ‘Ecology of deep sand excavation’

Culture
November 27
09:30 – 12:30
BK Faculty – Classroom U
·      Jacqueline Heerema, Artists Collective Satellietgroep, ‘Zandmotor, a cultural phenomenon’
·      Esther Kokmeijer, Visual/ Conceptual Artist, ‘Deep meaning of voyaging’

 

* The lecture series program is open to the public.

Transitional Territories Studio
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence

Studio Leader:
dr.arch. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Guest Professor:
prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons
Researchers:
ir. Filippo laFleur
ir. Geert van der Meulen

Instructors/ Mentors:
Architecture & Urbanism
dr.arch.
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Architecture
arch.
Stefano Milani
dr.arch.
Nicola Marzot
Urbanism
dr.
Fransje Hooimeijer
dr. Diego Carmona Sepulveda
dr.arch. Luisa Calabrese
Landscape Architecture
dr. Daniele Cannatella
Building Technology
ir. Sjap Holst
Policy Analysis
dr. Jos Timmermans

Scales and subjects:
Territory
Infrastructure
Landscape
Ground
Body

Studio Themes:
State of Exception
New biopolitical order of the North Sea: ecology, energy, protein
Infrastructural Form
Where architecture, city, and territory meet
Fourth Nature
The rise of landscape as counter economy
The Last Lands
The architecture of the fluid ground

Transitional Territories Studio 2018-2019 North Sea

“I am most touched by those places where damage and grace are inextricably entangled.”
Frank Gohlke, Thoughts on Landscape

Courtesy of Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC @ visibleearth.nasa.gov

Courtesy of Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC @ visibleearth.nasa.gov

Transitional Territories Studio 2018-2019
North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence.
Altered Natures and the Architecture of Extremes

In collaboration with
MVI North Sea Energy Lab — Special Workshop and Lecture Series Program
UNESCO-IHE
TUDelft DIMI

Joint Design Studio
AA Architectural Association School of Architecture, London

Studio Leader
dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, t.bacchin (at) tudelft.nl

Special Guest Professor
prof.ir. Dirk Sijmons
H+N+S Landscape Architects / MVI North Sea Energy Lab

Instructors/ Mentors

Architecture & Urbanism

dr.ir.
Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin

Architecture
ir.
Stefano Milani (responsible instructor Architecture & Public Building)
dr.ir.
Nicola Marzot

Urbanism

dr.
Fransje Hooimeijer
dr. Diego Sepulveda Carmona

Landscape Architecture

dr. Steffen Nijhuis
ir.
Denise Piccinini

Building Technology

ir. Sjap Holst

Graduation Sections
Urban Design
Architecture & Public Building
Environmental Modelling
Landscape Architecture
Hydraulic Structures & Flood Risk
Policy Analysis


Transitional Territories is an interdisciplinary design studio (architecture, urbanism, landscape architecture, hydraulic structures and flood risk, policy analysis) with a strong emphasis on the translation of research output into design concepts. During the graduation year students will develop an analytic, critical and conceptual approach to design and learn how to use research and design methods such as system analysis (spatial and temporal dimensions), perception/ phenomenology/ narration, performative/ process based design, and designing with uncertainty. The studio is founded on theories of complexity, territorialism, infrastructure space, landscape urbanism and ecology, environmental risk and transition management (dynamic adaptation).

For the academic year 2018-2019 Transitional Territories Studio focuses on the North Sea territory and its altered state as an outcome of increased urbanisation and environmental degradation, and by the consequences of extreme weather and resource scarcity. These modifications take place and are represented in different levels – from the transcalar and often invisible levels of processes to the scale of the architecture.

The studio will explore the altered geography of the North Sea territory and the possibility of a new development logic between land and sea. Therefore, in the North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio we would anticipate modifications that are expected to happen and project new spatial forms under a revised territorial narrative.

Landscapes of Coexistence — A territorial perspective
Historically, the North Sea has been a contested territory. While bordering the mainland Europe it has been often turned into a platform for geopolitical affairs with the UK as well as the Nordic countries. Such strategic role has manifested itself in various military, religious, economic, and social ties and divides, which has consequently made the North Sea a confliction common ground. The ongoing refugee crisis or the Brexit are only very recent examples of such a long history. As a result, the sea is not seen anymore a periphery of Europe but rather a central territory and a point of departure through which the idea of Europe would be defined or challenged. Therefore, in the North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio we would celebrate these controversial aspects of the sea, not anymore as an extra-territorial space and a limit to the land, but rather as the main point an autonomous entity through which the political, environmental, economic and societal questions could be addressed. In this way any spatial proposition, whether landscape, urban or architectural, would be challenged and revisited through the lens of the North Sea as a referenced territory for new spatial interventions. Students are encouraged to redefine the role of the territory of the sea and particularly its land borders/ coastal cities, addressing the complex, yet not so visible, spatial, juridical, environmental and geopolitical natures of the North Sea.

 

North Sea Proteine Flows. Image Courtesy: Yelin Zhang (D-i Studio 2017-2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Studio Assignment

During the graduation year students will be asked to reflect on aspects of spatial morphology (scale, form, structure, performance), landform (geology, altimetry/bathymetry, topography), and the diachrony and diversity of mechanisms (e.g. logistics, energy production, coastal management, migration) re-shaping the North Sea continuously. TT studio individual projects will be sited in different geographic locations along the sea’s north and south coastlines. Within the scope of the TT studio, students will be able to formulate their fascination and choose their own assignment (design, engineering, policy) which can vary from buildings, constructions and public works to urban areas, landscapes and regions.

Studio Meta-Themes

– Risk and beyond: exploring a projective dimension towards the sea (and/or triggered by the sea), and in the specific context of the North Sea region

– Exploration of the limit: the notion of “limit” as conceptual framework at the base for an explorative design research in the North Sea region

– Water related design as a creative (or, conversely, innovative) form for reimagining Architecture/Urbanism/Landscape Architecture/Water Engineering purpose and their collective character

North Sea: 4 Studio Themes

1. North Sea as the State of Exception
Ecology, Power, and Infrastructure

2. E Mare Libertas
The Architecture of the Fluid Ground

3. Tomorrow, or the End of Time
Fourth Nature: A Manifesto 

4. Infrastructural Form
Where Architecture, City, and Territory meet

North Sea: 4 Geographies

1. North-west Denmark / South-west Norway coast
2. North-east Scotland coast
3. South-east England coast (Channel)
4. North France coast (Channel)

Troll C Platform. Image courtesy: Mihai Turtoi (D-i 2017-2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Studio objectives

  • To develop an innovative didactic exchange among the disciplines of Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis
  • To operate analytical research at the large territorial scale of lowland regions
  • To formulate comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Engineering and Policy design strategies (considering the different spatial and temporal scales relevant for the design)
  • To elaborate and apply a comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis research and innovative design methodologies
  • To prepare students to work on both research innovation and design projects in design offices and governmental departments

Learning objectives

  • Students will be able to operate analytical research at a large territorial scale of delta regions
  • Students specific architectural/urban/landscape/engineering/policy interscalar design task
  • Students will be able to share and integrate knowledge from other disciplines
  • Students will be able to formulate a highly individualised design approach
  • Students will be able to apply innovative design methodologies and creative techniques for their design
  • Students will be able to select and apply comprehensive constructive techniques
  • Students will be able to express and represent their design ideas at appropriate scales

Additional information please visit:
TUDelft Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment – MSc3/4 Studio TT 2018-2019

Transitional Territories Graduation Studio

Reclaimed Power
Altered painting by Peter Balke. Author: Boaz Peters, TT Studio 2018-2019

 

— TT Studio – North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence 2019-2020
TT Studio – North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence 2018-2019

D-i Studio – North Sea: Landscapes of Coexistence Studio 2017-2018
Archive

Transitional Territories Graduation Studio
Transitional Territories is an interdisciplinary design studio (MSc. Architecture and MSc. Urbanism tracks in collaboration with Landscape Architecture, Hydraulic Structures & Flood Risk, Policy Analysis) focusing on the notion of territory as a constructed project across scales, subjects and media. In particular, the studio focuses on the agency of design in territories at risk between land and water (maritime, riverine, delta landscapes), and the dialectical (or inseparable) relation between nature and culture.

— Focus and approach
Informed by Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Spatial Planning & Urban Design theory & research, the studio explores—through design and representation—new pathways of inquiry moving beyond traditional methods and concepts. During the graduation year, students will develop an analytic, critical and conceptual approach to design and learn how to use the project as knowledge producer (Viganò, 2016) by means of cartography, system analysis, phenomenology (of time/ space), narration, process based design, scenario planning and systems thinking (uncertainty). The scale of individual projects can vary from buildings and (infra)structures to entire landscapes and regions. The studio is founded on notions of complexity, territorialism, infrastructure space, (landscape) ecology, environmental risk (extremes), geophilosophy, biopolitics, transition and policy analysis.

Waterscapes and territories – at sea, delta, and/or riverine landscapes – are increasingly becoming the arena of radical climatic changes, resource depletion, political/economic instability, and socio-spatial inequalities. Their fragile state requires the envisioning of an interdisciplinary design knowledge that mediates form, performance, and representation under the influence of various states and scales of control. Within this context, the central question of the studio is how biophysical, socioeconomic, cultural and political changes (and related risks) in maritime, riverine, and/or delta landscapes can be addressed by the architecture and urbanism project. The scale can vary from buildings, constructions and public works to urban areas, landscapes and regions.

Studio Assignment
During the graduation year students will be asked to reflect on aspects of spatial morphology (scale, form, structure, performance), landform (geology, altimetry/bathymetry, topography), and the diachrony and diversity of mechanisms (e.g. logistics, energy production, coastal management, migration) re-shaping the North Sea continuously. TT studio individual projects will be sited in different geographic locations (of choice) along the sea’s north, central and south coastlines. Within the scope of the TT studio, students will be able to formulate their fascination and choose their own assignment (design, engineering, policy) which can vary from buildings, constructions and public works to urban areas, landscapes and regions.

— Studio Meta-Themes
Risk and beyond: exploring a projective dimension towards the sea (and/or triggered by the sea), and in the specific context of the North Sea region

Exploration of the limit: the notion of “limit” as conceptual framework at the base for an explorative design research in the North Sea region

Water related design as a creative (or, conversely, innovative) form for reimagining Architecture/Urbanism/Landscape Architecture/Water Engineering purpose and their collective character

— Studio objectives
To develop an innovative didactic exchange among the disciplines of Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis

To operate analytical research at the large territorial scale of lowland regions

To formulate comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Engineering and Policy design strategies (considering the different spatial and temporal scales relevant for the design)

To elaborate and apply a comprehensive Architecture, Urbanism, Landscape, Water Engineering and Policy Analysis research and innovative design methodologies

To prepare students to work/ initiate both research and design projects in design offices and governmental departments

— Learning objectives
Students will be able to operate analytical research across scale – from, territorial, landscape scales, to architectural, object scales

Students specific architectural/urban/landscape/engineering/policy interscalar design task

Students will be able to share and integrate knowledge from other disciplines

Students will be able to formulate a highly individualised design approach

Students will be able to apply innovative design methodologies and creative techniques for their design

Students will be able to select and apply comprehensive constructive techniques

Students will be able to express and represent their design ideas at appropriate scales through writings, drawings, and physical models

— Themes & Methods (a projective approach to waterscapes)
Territorialism
Infrastructure & Geopolitical Space
Landscape Design and Phenomenology
Process-Based Design
Designing with Uncertainty/ Climate Adaptation
Integrated Spatial Planning & Flood Risk Management/ Water Sensitivity
Public Works (Buildings)

The studio will contribute to the collective research of the Delta Urbanism Interdisciplinary Research Program. Students will take a position on the future of urbanised landscapes (the production of territory) reflecting on new interdependencies between natural processes, societal practices and (geo)political projects. Throughout the studio, students will discuss their observations and statements with both teachers and external experts.

The Transitional Territories MSc 3-4 graduation studio is only offered in the fall semester.
For detailed course descriptions, please visit the study guide: MSc 3/4

* Please note: Urbanism students should enroll for the Laboratory Urban Transformations and Sustainability

Information:
dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, t.bacchin (at) tudelft.nl
Studio Leader